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The Diversity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

  • Corey W. Liu
  • Viktor Y. Alekseyev
  • Jeffrey R. Allwardt
  • Alexander J. Bankovich
  • Barbara J. Cade-Menun
  • Ronald W. Davis
  • Lin-Shu Du
  • K. Christopher Garcia
  • Daniel Herschlag
  • Chaitan Khosla
  • Daniel A. Kraut
  • Qing Li
  • Brian Null
  • Joseph D. Puglisi
  • Paul A. Sigala
  • Jonathan F. Stebbins
  • Luca Varani
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics book series (NAPSB)

The discovery of the physical phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in 1946 gave rise to the spectroscopic technique that has become a remarkably versatile research tool. One could oversimplify NMR spectros-copy by categorizing it into the two broad applications of structure elucidation of molecules (associated with chemistry and biology) and imaging (associated with medicine). But, this certainly does not do NMR spectroscopy justice in demonstrating its general acceptance and utilization across the sciences. This manuscript is not an effort to present an exhaustive, or even partial review of NMR spectroscopy applications, but rather to provide a glimpse at the wide-ranging uses of NMR spectroscopy found within the confines of a single magnetic resonance research facility, the Stanford Magnetic Resonance Laboratory. Included here are summaries of projects involving protein structure determination, mapping of intermolecular interactions, exploring fundamental biological mechanisms, following compound cycling in the environmental, analysis of synthetic solid compounds, and microimaging of a model organism.

Keywords

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Acyl Carrier Protein Oxyanion Hole Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shift 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Corey W. Liu
    • 1
  • Viktor Y. Alekseyev
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jeffrey R. Allwardt
    • 4
    • 5
  • Alexander J. Bankovich
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Barbara J. Cade-Menun
    • 9
    • 10
  • Ronald W. Davis
    • 11
    • 12
    • 13
  • Lin-Shu Du
    • 14
    • 15
  • K. Christopher Garcia
    • 16
    • 17
    • 18
  • Daniel Herschlag
    • 19
  • Chaitan Khosla
    • 20
    • 21
    • 22
  • Daniel A. Kraut
    • 23
    • 24
  • Qing Li
    • 25
    • 26
  • Brian Null
    • 27
    • 28
    • 29
  • Joseph D. Puglisi
    • 30
    • 31
  • Paul A. Sigala
    • 16
    • 17
    • 18
  • Jonathan F. Stebbins
    • 32
  • Luca Varani
    • 33
    • 34
    • 35
  1. 1.Stanford Magnetic Resonance LaboratoryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  3. 3.GenencorPalo AltoUSA
  4. 4.Department of Geological & Environmental SciencesStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  5. 5.ConocoPhillips CompanyHoustonUSA
  6. 6.Department of Molecular and Cellular PhysiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  7. 7.Department of Structural BiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  8. 8.Department of Microbiology & ImmunologyUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  9. 9.Department of Geological & Environmental SciencesStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  10. 10.Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaSwift CurrentCanada
  11. 11.Stanford Genome Technology CenterStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  12. 12.Department of BiochemistryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  13. 13.Bio-X ProgramStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  14. 14.Department of Geological & Environmental SciencesStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  15. 15.Air Products and ChemicalsInc. AllentownPennsylvaniaUSA
  16. 16.Department of Molecular and Cellular PhysiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  17. 17.Department of Structural BiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  18. 18.Howard Hughes Medical InstituteStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  19. 19.Department of BiochemistryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  20. 20.Department of ChemistryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  21. 21.Department of BiochemistryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  22. 22.Department of Chemical EngineeringStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  23. 23.Department of BiochemistryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  24. 24.Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Cell BiologyNorthwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA
  25. 25.Department of ChemistryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  26. 26.Institute for Research in BiomedicineBellinzonaSwitzerland
  27. 27.Stanford Genome Technology CenterStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  28. 28.Department of BiochemistryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  29. 29.Bio-X ProgramStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  30. 30.Stanford Magnetic Resonance LaboratoryStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  31. 31.Department of Structural BiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  32. 32.Department of Geological & Environmental SciencesStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  33. 33.Department of Molecular and Cellular PhysiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  34. 34.Department of Structural BiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  35. 35.Institute for Research in BiomedicineBellinzonaSwitzerland

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