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Subjective Well-Being

  • Ed Diener
Chapter
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 37)

Abstract

The literature on subjective well-being (SWB), including happiness, life satisfaction, and positive affect, is reviewed in three areas: measurement, causal factors, and theory. Psychometric data on single-item and multi-item subjective well-being scales are presented, and the measures are compared. Measuring various components of subjective well-being is discussed. In terms of causal influences, research findings on the demographic correlates of SWB are evaluated, as well as the findings on other influences such as health, social contact, activity, and personality. A number of theoretical approaches to happiness are presented and discussed: telic theories, associationistic models, activity theories, judgment approaches, and top-down versus bottom-up conceptions.

Keywords

Life Satisfaction Negative Affect Positive Affect Doctoral Dissertation Social Contact 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ed Diener
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of IllinoisChampaignUSA

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