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Dyslexie pp 107-118 | Cite as

Dyslexie, ADHD en hun co-morbiditeit

augustus 2004
  • H.F.M Peters
  • R. Bastiaanse
  • J. Van Borsel
  • P.H.O. Dejonckere
  • K. Jansonius-Schultheiss
  • Sj. Van der Meulen
  • B.J.E. Mondelaers

Samenvatting

Dyslexie en adhd zijn twee vaak voorkomende stoornissen bij kinderen. Volgens de Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, vierde editie (dsm-iv) komt dyslexie bij ongeveer 4 procent van de kinderen voor en adhd bij ongeveer 5-10 procent van de kinderen (American Psychiatric Association, 1994).

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Copyright information

© Bohn Stafleu van Loghum, onderdeel van Springer Media 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • H.F.M Peters
  • R. Bastiaanse
  • J. Van Borsel
  • P.H.O. Dejonckere
  • K. Jansonius-Schultheiss
  • Sj. Van der Meulen
  • B.J.E. Mondelaers

There are no affiliations available

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