Advertisement

Stotteren pp 103-119 | Cite as

Diagnostiek bij volwassen stotteraars

november 2005
  • H.F.M. Peters

Samenvatting

Diagnostiek en behandeling van stotteraars worden in sterke mate bepaald door het theoretisch concept waar de clinicus van uitgaat in zijn benadering van het stotterprobleem.

Literatuur

  1. Andrews, G., & Cutler, J. (1974). Stuttering therapy: the relations between changes in symptom level and attitudes. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 39, 312-19.Google Scholar
  2. Brutten, E.J., & Shoemaker , D.J (1967). The modification of stuttering. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  3. Brutten, G.J. (1975). Stuttering: topography, assessment and behavior change strategies. In J. Eisenson (ed.). Stuttering: a second symposium. New York: Harper & Row (p. 199-263).Google Scholar
  4. Brutten, G.J., & Vanryckeghem, M. (2003). Behavior assessment battery. Destelbergen, Belgium: Stichting Integratie Gehandicapten.Google Scholar
  5. Conture, E.G. (2001). Stuttering: its nature, diagnoses and treatment. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
  6. Craig, A.R., Franklin, J., & Andrews, G. (1984). A scale to measure locus of control of behaviour. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 57, 173-80.Google Scholar
  7. Culatta, R., & Goldberg, S.A. (1995). Stuttering therapy: an integrated approach to therapy and practice. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
  8. Dam-Baggen, R. van, & Kraaimaat, F.W. (1999). Assessing social anxiety: the inventory of interpersonal situations (iis). European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 1, 25-38.Google Scholar
  9. Denil, L.F. (1999a). Uncovering the neural basis of stuttering: Recent contributions from functional neuroimaging. In E. Manders, D. Lembrechts en P. Bastijns (red.). Stotteren: recente inzichten. Leuven: Acco (p. 75-93).Google Scholar
  10. Denil, L.F. (1999b). Stuttering: A neurophysiological perspective. In N. Bernstein Ratner & E.C. Healey (eds). Stuttering research and practice: Bridging the gap. Mahwah, nj: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates (p. 85-102).Google Scholar
  11. Denil, L.F., Kroll, R.M., Lafaille, S.J., & Houle, S. (2003). A positron emission tomography study of short- and longterm treatment effects on functional brain activation in adults who stutter. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 28, 357-81.Google Scholar
  12. Erickson, R.L. (1969). Assessing communication attitudes among stutterers. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 12, 711-24.Google Scholar
  13. Felsenfeld, S. (1997). Epidemiology and genetics of stuttering. In R.F. Curlee & G.M. Siegel (eds). The nature and treatment of stuttering: new directions. (2nd ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon (p. 3-23).Google Scholar
  14. Franken, M.C. (1997). Evaluation of stuttering therapy: Development of tools for measuring speech quality. Dissertatie kun, Nijmegen.Google Scholar
  15. Guitar, B. (1998). Stuttering. An integrated approach to its nature and treatment. (2nd ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.Google Scholar
  16. Hulstijn, W., Peters, H.F.M., & Lieshout, P.H.H.M. van (1997). Speech production: Motor control, brain research and fluency disorders. Amsterdam: Elsevier.Google Scholar
  17. Janssen, P., & Kraaimaat, F. (1980). Disfluency and anxiety in stuttering and non-stutter-ing adolescents. Behavioural Analyses and Modification, 4, 116-26.Google Scholar
  18. Janssen, P. (1985). Gedragstherapie bij stotteren. Utrecht: Scheltema & Holkema.Google Scholar
  19. Janssen, P. (1997). Etiologie van stotteren. Theorieën en modellen. In H.F.M. Peters e.a. (red.). Handboek stem-spraak-taalpathologie (katern B7.1.1). Houten: Bohn Stafleu van Loghum.Google Scholar
  20. Kent, R. (1985). Stuttering as a temporal programming disorder. In R.F. Curlee & W.W.H. Perkins (eds). Nature and treatment of stuttering: New directions. New York: Elsevier North Holland (p. 283-301).Google Scholar
  21. Kleinof, J., & Smith, A. (2000). Influence of length and syntactic complexity on speech motor stability of fluent speech of adults who stutter. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 43, 548-59.Google Scholar
  22. Kraaimaat, F.W. (1980). Stotteren: een moleculaire analyse van het stottergedrag. Lisse: Swets & Zeitlinger.Google Scholar
  23. Kraaimaat, F.W., Vanryckeghem, M., & Dam-Baggen, R. van (2002). Stuttering and social anxiety. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 27, 319-31.Google Scholar
  24. Lanyon, R.I. (1967). The measurement of stutter severity. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 10, 836-843.Google Scholar
  25. Lieshout, P.H.H.M. van (1995). Motor planning and articulation in fluent speech of stutterers. Nijmegen, The Netherlands: University of Nijmegen.Google Scholar
  26. Lieshout, P.H.H.M. van, Hulstijn, W., & Peters, H.F.M. (1996). Speech production in people who stutter: testing the motor plan assembly hypothesis. Journal of Speech an Hearing Research, 39, 76-92.Google Scholar
  27. Lieshout, P.H.H.M. van, Hulstijn, W., & Peters, H.F.M. (2004). Searching for the weak link in the speech production chain of people who stutter: a motor skill approach. In B. Maassen, R. Kent, H. Peters, P. van Lieshout & W. Hulstijn (eds). Speech motor control in normal and disordered speech. Oxford: Oxford University Press (p. 313-56).Google Scholar
  28. Ludlow, C.J., & Loucks, T. (2003). Stuttering: a dynamic motor control disorder. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 28, 273-97.Google Scholar
  29. Max, L. (2004). Stuttering and internal models for sensorimotor control: a theoretical perspective to generate testable hypotheses. In B. Maassen, R. Kent, H. Peters, P. van Lieshout & W. Hulstijn (eds). Speech motor control in normal and disordered speech. Oxford: Oxford University Press (p. 357-87).Google Scholar
  30. McCauley, R.J. (1996). Familiar strangers: criterion-referenced measures in communication disorders. Language, Speech and Hearing Services in Schools, 27, 122-31.Google Scholar
  31. Menzies, R.J., Onslow, M., & Packman, A. (1999). Anxiety and stuttering: exploring a complex relationship. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 8, 3-10.Google Scholar
  32. Peters, H.F.M., & Boves, L. (1989). Coordination of aerodynamic and phonatory processes in fluent speech utterances of stutterers. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 31, 352 61.Google Scholar
  33. Peters, H.F.M., Hietkamp, R., & Boves, L. (1995). Aerodynamic and phonatory processes in dysfluent speech utterances of stutterers. In C.W. Starkweather & H.F.M. Peters (eds). Stuttering: Proceedings of the 1st World Congress on Fluency Disorders. International Fluency Association (p. 76-81).Google Scholar
  34. Peters, H.F.M. (1999). Stotteren: de spraakmotorische component. In E. Manders, D. Lembrechts en P. Bastijns (red.). Stotteren: recente inzichten. Leuven: Acco (p. 93-117).Google Scholar
  35. Peters, H.F.M., Hulstijn, W., & Lieshout, P.H.H.M. van (2000). Recent developments in speech motor research into stuttering. Folia Phoniatrica and Logopedica, 52, 103-19.Google Scholar
  36. Riley, G., Riley, J., & Becket, R. (1986). Oral motor assessment and treatment. Tigard, or: C.C. Publications.Google Scholar
  37. Riley, G. (1994). Stuttering severity instrument for children and adults. (3rd ed.). Austin, tx: Pro-Ed.Google Scholar
  38. Shapiro, D.A. (1999). Stuttering intervention. Austin, tx: Pro-Ed.Google Scholar
  39. Sheehan, J.C. (1975). Conflict theory and avoidance reduction therapy. In J. Eisenson (ed.).Google Scholar
  40. Stuttering: A second symposium. New York: Harper (p. 97-199). Smith, A., & Kelly, E. (1997). Stuttering: A dynamic multifactorial model. In R.F. Curlee &Google Scholar
  41. G.M. Siegel (eds). Nature and treatment of stuttering: New directions. (2nd ed.). NeedhamGoogle Scholar
  42. Heights, ma: Allyn & Bacon (p. 204-17). Smith, A. (1999). Stuttering: A unified approach to a multifactorial, dynamic disorder. InGoogle Scholar
  43. N. Bernstein Ratner & E.C. Healey (eds). Stuttering research and practice: Bridging the gap. Mahwah, nj: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates (p. 27-45).Google Scholar
  44. Stager, S.V., Jeffries, K.J., & Braun, A.R. (2003). Common features of fluency-evoking conditions studied in stuttering subjects and controls: an H(2)15O pet study. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 28, 319-36.Google Scholar
  45. Woolf, G. (1967). The assessment of stuttering as struggle, avoidance and expectancy. British Journal of Disorders of Communication, 2, 158-71. World Health Organization (1980). International classification of impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Geneva: World Health Organization. World Health Organization (2001). International classification of functioning, disability and health. Geneva: World Health Organization. Yairi, E., Ambrose, N., & Cox, N. (1996). Genetics of stuttering: a critical review. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 39, 771-84. Yaruss, J.S. (2001). Evaluating treatment outcomes for adults who stutter. Journal of Communication Disorders, 34, 163-82.Google Scholar
  46. Yaruss, J.S., & Quasal, R.W. (2004). Overall assessment of speaker’s experience of stuttering (oases). In A. Packmann, A. Meltzer & H.F.M. Peters (eds). Theory, research and therapy in fluency disorders. Proceedings of the 4th World Congress on Fluency Disorders. Nijmegen: Nijmegen University Press (p. 237-41).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Bohn Stafleu van Loghum, onderdeel van Springer Media 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • H.F.M. Peters
    • 1
  1. 1.Afdeling Keel-, Neus- en Oorheelkundeumc St RadboudNijmegen

Personalised recommendations