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Stotteren pp 47-82 | Cite as

De ontwikkeling van stotteren

augustus 2004
  • M.C. Franken

Samenvatting

Stotteren begint meestal geleidelijk, wanneer kinderen tussen de twee en vier jaar oud zijn, doorgaans vóór het zevende levensjaar.

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© Bohn Stafleu van Loghum, onderdeel van Springer Media 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • M.C. Franken
    • 1
  1. 1.kno/Gehoor en Spraak CentrumErasmus mc – SophiaRotterdam

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