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Taal pp 57-95 | Cite as

Primaire taalontwikkeling

december 1997
  • H.F.M Peters
  • R. Bastiaanse
  • J. Van Borsel
  • P.H.O. Dejonckere
  • K. Jansonius-Schultheiss
  • Sj. Van der Meulen
  • B.J.E. Mondelaers

Samenvatting

Het produceren en begrijpen van taal door mensen berust op een gecompliceerde cognitieve machinerie.

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Aanbevolen literatuur

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Copyright information

© Bohn Stafleu van Loghum, onderdeel van Springer Media 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • H.F.M Peters
  • R. Bastiaanse
  • J. Van Borsel
  • P.H.O. Dejonckere
  • K. Jansonius-Schultheiss
  • Sj. Van der Meulen
  • B.J.E. Mondelaers

There are no affiliations available

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