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Fonologische en articulatorische planningsstoornissen: modellen en vormen

maart 2006
  • H.F.M Peters
  • R. Bastiaanse
  • J. Van Borsel
  • P.H.O. Dejonckere
  • K. Jansonius-Schultheiss
  • Sj. Van der Meulen
  • B.J.E. Mondelaers
Chapter

Samenvatting

In dit katern worden stoornissen in de spraakproductie behandeld, die te verklaren zijn vanuit een afwijkende ontwikkeling van de regelkennis en toepassing van de fonologie of vanuit een stoornis in de articulatorische planning.

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Copyright information

© Bohn Stafleu van Loghum, onderdeel van Springer Media 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • H.F.M Peters
  • R. Bastiaanse
  • J. Van Borsel
  • P.H.O. Dejonckere
  • K. Jansonius-Schultheiss
  • Sj. Van der Meulen
  • B.J.E. Mondelaers

There are no affiliations available

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