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5 Temperament, persoonlijkheid en de ontwikkeling van emotionele- en gedragsproblemen

  • Filip de Fruyt
  • Barbara de Clercq
  • Marleen de Bolle

Samenvatting

Kinderen verschillen in gedrag, in hoe ze denken over zichzelf en hun omgeving, en in het ervaren en uiten van emoties. De onderliggende latente en stabiele componenten van deze verschillen worden in de psychologie aangeduid als temperament- en persoonlijkheidseigenschappen. Het doel van dit hoofdstuk is om de lezer een model met persoonlijkheidstrekken en dimensies aan te reiken dat nuttig is om emotionele- en gedragsproblemen bij kinderen en adolescenten te begrijpen, te diagnosticeren en te behandelen.

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Aanbevolen literatuur

  1. Clercq, B. de, Fruyt, F. de, Leeuwen, K. van, & Mervielde, I. (2006). Maladaptive personality traits in childhood: a first step toward an integrative developmental perspective for DSM-V. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 115, 639-657.Google Scholar
  2. Clercq, B. de, & Fruyt, F. de (2007). Childhood antecedents of personality disorders. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 20, 57-61.Google Scholar
  3. Fruyt, F. de, Bartels, M., Leeuwen, K.G. van, Clercq, B. de, Decuyper, M., & Mervielde, I. (2006). Five types of personality continuity in childhood and adolescence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91, 538-552.Google Scholar
  4. Tackett, J.L. (2006). Evaluating models of the personality – psychopathology relationship in children and adolescents. Clinical Psychology Review, 26, 584-599.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Bohn Stafleu van Loghum, onderdeel van Springer Uitgeverij 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Filip de Fruyt
  • Barbara de Clercq
  • Marleen de Bolle

There are no affiliations available

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