Saline Irrigation for Productive Agroforestry Systems

Chapter

Abstract

Land irrigation is playing a major role in enhancing food and livelihood security in the world over. Nevertheless, a typical scenario in the ground water-irrigated regions has emerged; the areas characterized by water scarcity also usually have underlying aquifers of poor quality. Though possibilities have now emerged to safely use waters otherwise designated unfit if the characteristics of water, soil, and intended usages are known. But it is neither feasible nor economical to use highly saline waters for crop production, especially on lands that are already degraded. Best land use under such situations is to retire these areas to alternative uses through agroforestry. With growing scientific and social recognition of many diversified uses of salt-tolerant plants, the research efforts have led to the development of planting technique and other practices for critical management of salts and water in root zone so as to rehabilitate the degraded lands successfully using saline irrigation. Several salt-tolerant plants have been identified with benefits as fuelwood, greening, fruits, forage, and medicinal and aromatic uses in addition to allowing for crop production activity underneath these (agroforestry). Many halophytes also have potential to be used as traditional food, forages and animal feeds, oil seeds, and energy crops.

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© Springer India 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Central Soil Salinity Research InstituteKarnalIndia
  2. 2.National Institute of Abiotic Stress ManagementBaramati, PuneIndia

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