Introduction—Modern Indian Philosophy: From Colonialism to Cosmopolitanism

Chapter
Part of the Sophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures book series (SCPT, volume 11)

Abstract

The issue of colonialism and the emergence of new identities in traditional Indian society have engaged the critical attention of scholars from diverse fields of inquiry such as history, sociology, politics, as well as religious and subaltern studies.

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© Indian Institute of Advanced Study 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Indian Institute of Advanced StudyShimlaIndia

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