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Articulation of hierarchy and networks as an evolving social structure

  • Juliette Rouchier
  • Emmanual Lazega
  • Lise Mounier
Conference paper
Part of the Agent-Based Social Systems book series (ABSS, volume 3)

Abstract

This paper describes agent-based simulations designed to study emerging networks that are created thanks to different logics of communication. The model is inspired by sociological observations led in a courthouse, in Paris, and by assumptions on the motivations for individuals to interact in this context. Two ways to choose communication partner are here represented: by following a pre-existing hierarchy; by reproducing past interactions. Both logics are described as well as their effect on the evolution of networks, and their combination is analyzed. The work is in its first phase, and although we get inspiration from real world observation, we are not leading yet a complete comparison of artificial and real society but more an exploration on how the simulations could help us in the following interview research and potentially eliminate some of our hypothesis.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juliette Rouchier
    • 1
  • Emmanual Lazega
    • 1
  • Lise Mounier
    • 1
  1. 1.GREQAM-CNRSMarseilleFrance

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