Advertisement

A Study on Pedestrian Flow by Using an Agent Model —A Simulation Analysis on the Asagiri Overpass Accident, 2001—

  • Toshiyuki Kaneda
  • Hikaru Yano
  • Tomohiko Misaka
  • Tomohiko Suzuki
  • Tetsuya Yamada
Conference paper

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to analyze pedestrian flows on road crossing and overpasses through applying agent-based simulation that has pedestrian’s 18 behavioral rules on cellular-automata space. As a case study of high-density flow simulation, the authors try to trace an occurrence process of the accident of Asagiri Pedestrian Overpass, Akashi City, which several news media had reported, by the ‘falling down like ninepins by confrontation flows’ hypothesis. In the low-density case, through comparing between the simulation results and the survey data, we have verified similar patterns of the pedestrian flow under our devised rule conditions. In the high-density case, under an assumption of the confrontation flows hypothesis, we verified that the point triggered the actual accident and the simulation result coincided nearly. Thus, our agent simulation has the potentials to get insightful suggestions on analyses on pedestrians’ accidents.

Keyword

Agent-Base Simulation Pedestrian Flow Accident Analysis 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Akashi City Summer Festival Accident Fact-Finding Committee (2002), Fact-Finding Report on Fire-work Festival Accident at The 32nd Akashi Citizen Summer Festival (Summary, in Japanese)Google Scholar
  2. Architectural Institute of Japan (1980) The Compilation Data for Architectural Design Vol.3, Maruzen Co., Ltd (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  3. Casti J (1996) Would Be Worlds-How Simulation is Changing The Frontiers of Science. John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
  4. Epstein J, Axtell R (1996) Growing Artificial Societies — Social Science From The Bottom Up. The Brooking Institution.Google Scholar
  5. Fruin J (1974) Pedestrian Planning and Design. Elevator World Inc.Google Scholar
  6. Hall E (1966) The Hidden Dimension, Doubleday.Google Scholar
  7. Kaneda T et al (2001) Simulator Complex for RoboCup Rescue Simulation Project — As Test-Bed for Multi-Agent Organizational Behavior in Emergency Case of Large-Scale Disaster. RoboCup-2000: Robot Soccer World Cup IV(Stone, P., Balch. T. and Kraetszchmar, G. eds.), Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Springer Verlag, Berlin.Google Scholar
  8. Kato T, et, al (1980) Analysis on Confrontation flow of Pedestrians, Confrontation flow In Transactions of Architectural Institute of Japan 289, p 119 (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  9. Sakakibara K (1990) The Design of Walking Space — The Technique of Urban Design and Attractive Town Management. Gakugei Syuppansya (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  10. Schelling T (1978) Micro Motives and Macro behavior, W.W.Norton — Company.Google Scholar
  11. Structure Planning Laboratory (2000) Agent Based Simulator User’s Manual (in Japanese).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshiyuki Kaneda
    • 1
  • Hikaru Yano
    • 2
  • Tomohiko Misaka
    • 1
  • Tomohiko Suzuki
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Yamada
    • 1
  1. 1.Nagoya Institute of TechnologyGokiso, Showa, NagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Isac, IncShibuya, TokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations