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Navigation and Animation in a Volume Visualization System

  • Arie E. Kaufman
  • Lisa M. Sobierajski
  • Ricardo S. Avila
  • Taosong He
Part of the Computer Animation Series book series (3056)

Abstract

The VolVis system for volume visualization supports numerous visualization algorithms and methods within a consistent and well-organized framework. Navigation and Animation components have been incorporated into VolVis which allow interactive object manipulation and quick specification of complex animation sequences. Navigation is controlled by a variety of 2D and 3D input devices. VolVis includes a unified protocol for communicating with these input devices, allowing for input device independent development.

Keywords

Volume Rendering VolVis 3D Input Devices Volumetric Ray Tracing 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arie E. Kaufman
    • 1
  • Lisa M. Sobierajski
    • 1
  • Ricardo S. Avila
    • 2
  • Taosong He
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA
  2. 2.Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Neurobiology & BehaviorState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA

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