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A Probe-Based Approach for Designing Inspirational Services at Museums

  • Kumiyo NakakojiEmail author
  • Yasuhiro Yamamoto
Conference paper
  • 585 Downloads

Abstract

Our MESS (Museum Experiences and Service Science) project views a local museum as a place not only for communicating the fact and knowledge about exhibited objects with the visitors, but also for inspiring them. We have designed and set up design probes in a museum exhibition as a way to investigate how visitors got inspired at a museum. The applied design probes include LED-lit candles and a tea ceremony house for viewing old Japanese paintings, an improvisational dance workshop for appreciating an abstract modern-art sculpture, and an improvisational drama workshop for reading old family correspondence. The study has led us to identifying a set of features for inspiration, and moreover, revealed that curators and museum administrators in turn got inspired by the representations produced by the visitors through their engagement in museum experience.

Keywords

Service experience design Probe-based design approach Inspirational service Museum service Collective creativity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is supported by S3FIRE, RISTEX, JST. We are very much grateful to the other members of the MESS project, particularly for Takeshi Okada, Toshio Kawashima, Ken-ichi Kimura, for the discussions, design, data-collections, analyses and reflections on the Probe workshops.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Unit of Design, C-PierKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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