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Alien life: remarks on the exobiological perspective in recent terrestrial biology

  • Thomas Brandstetter
Part of the Studies in Space Policy book series (STUDSPACE, volume 5)

Abstract

At the beginning of the 20th century,extraterrestrial beings started to appear in biological thought. In literature,of course,they have a long history,and astronomers have speculated about life on other planets since the 17th century. However, these creatures were not situated in the framework of biological discourse: they were mirrors for criticising the social or political shortcomings of earthly life, they were arguments invoked to corroborate theological arguments about the creation, or they served as a means to reflect on the imperialistic aspiration of European powers.342

Keywords

Thought Experiment Early 21st Century Burgess Shale Existential Feeling Extraterrestrial Life 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2011

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  • Thomas Brandstetter

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