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How to Perform an Economic Healthcare Study

  • Jonathan EdgingtonEmail author
  • Xander Kerman
  • Lewis Shi
  • Jason L. Koh
Chapter

Abstract

Every society must face the challenge of allocation of limited resources to address healthcare needs. Orthopedic surgery is a specialty with some of the highest expenditures, yet treatments rarely address life-threatening ailments, instead targeting quality of life. It is therefore vital to demonstrate the value of these interventions through economic healthcare studies. Clinicians must understand the goals and methods of economic healthcare studies, which differ fundamentally from other clinical research projects. Economic healthcare studies frequently concern themselves with efficient care decisions, as well as equitable distribution of valuable care. Understanding and interpreting these results will help with allocation of finite resources and drive rational decision-making on both clinical and policy levels. While economic healthcare studies provide valuable information, the costs and benefits of medical interventions are frequently difficult to define. Despite these challenges, clinical researchers should study the economics of orthopedic care in order to provide optimal patient outcomes.

Keywords

Economic evaluation Health economics Cost-minimization analysis Cost-effectiveness analysis Cost-utility analysis Cost-benefit analysis 

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Copyright information

© ISAKOS 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Edgington
    • 1
    Email author
  • Xander Kerman
    • 2
  • Lewis Shi
    • 1
  • Jason L. Koh
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation MedicineUniversity of Chicago Medical CenterChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Pritzker School of Medicine, The University of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  3. 3.NorthShore Orthopaedic Institute, NorthShore University HealthSystemEvanstonUSA

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