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Embodied Cognition

  • Jonna LöfflerEmail author
  • Rouwen Cañal-Bruland
  • Markus Raab
Chapter

Zusammenfassung

Im Gegensatz zu klassischen, amodalen Kognitionstheorien, die das Gehirn als zentrale Instanz mentaler Repräsentationen und Kognition ansehen, postulieren Embodied-Cognition-Ansätze, dass Denkprozesse nicht unabhängig von Wahrnehmungs- und Bewegungsprozessen, sondern multimodal verkörperlicht sind. Im folgenden Kapitel werden die Ursprünge der Embodied-Cognition-Perspektive dargestellt und verschiedene neuere Embodied-Cognition-Ansätze mit ihrem jeweiligen Bezug zur Sportpsychologie beschrieben. Darauf aufbauend werden empirische Embodied-Cognition-Studien vorgestellt, die die Interaktionen zwischen Bewegung und Kognition sowie zwischen Bewegung und Wahrnehmung untersuchen. Zum Abschluss wird skizziert, wie Embodied-Cognition-Effekte spezifiziert und quantifiziert werden können. Außerdem werden Grenzen der Embodied-Cognition-Forschung aufgezeigt und Vorhersagen zur Zukunft von Embodied Cognition im Kontext der Sportpsychologie gemacht.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Deutschland, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonna Löffler
    • 1
    Email author
  • Rouwen Cañal-Bruland
    • 2
  • Markus Raab
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychologisches Institut, Abteilung LeistungspsychologieDeutsche Sporthochschule KölnKölnDeutschland
  2. 2.Institut für Sportwissenschaft, Arbeitsbereich Bewegungs- und SportpsychologieFriedrich-Schiller-Universität JenaJenaDeutschland

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