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Development of Quantum Physics

  • Wolfgang DemtröderEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Graduate Texts in Physics book series (GTP)

Abstract

At the beginning of the 20th century several experimental findings could not be explained by the existing theories of the time, which we will name “classical physics”. These experiments indicated that the conception of classical physics had to be modified. Examples are the measured spectral distribution of radiation from black bodies, which was in disagreement with theoretical predictions, the photo effect, the explanation of the Compton effect and a satisfactory answer to the question of why atoms in their lowest energetic state are stable.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fachbereich PhysikUniversität KaiserslauternKaiserslauternGermany

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