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Radio Propagation and Wireless Channel for Railway Communications

  • Zhang-Dui Zhong
  • Bo Ai
  • Gang Zhu
  • Hao Wu
  • Lei Xiong
  • Fang-Gang Wang
  • Lei Lei
  • Jian-Wen Ding
  • Ke Guan
  • Rui-Si He
Chapter
Part of the Advances in High-speed Rail Technology book series (ADVHIGHSPEED)

Abstract

In this chapter, we study radio propagation and wireless channels for railway communications. The first part of the chapter focuses on definitions of propagation scenarios. To begin with, high-speed railway propagation scenarios are partitioned, and the characteristics of each scenario are described in detail. Then, traditional concepts of railway communications and vehicular communications are summarized together to constitute a more general concept—wide-sense V2X (WSV2X). In this manner, the vehicles, trains, and infrastructures build up a wireless network enabling them to exchange controlling and traffic information, such as road obstacles, accidents, and so forth, via the wireless communication links. Correspondingly, all the propagation scenarios of WSV2X communications are defined in detail.

In the second part of the chapter, we shift our focus to high-speed railway channel measurements. Both narrowband and wideband measurement methods and systems are surveyed. Then, various measurement campaigns on high-speed railways are depicted and discussed in detail.

In the last part of the chapter, we study narrowband channel characteristics, i.e., path loss, shadow fading, and small-scale fading, for high-speed railways. Afterwards, we study wideband characteristics for high-speed railways in terms of delay characteristics, Doppler characteristics, and angular characteristics.

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Copyright information

© Beijing Jiaotong University Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhang-Dui Zhong
    • 1
  • Bo Ai
    • 1
  • Gang Zhu
    • 1
  • Hao Wu
    • 1
  • Lei Xiong
    • 1
  • Fang-Gang Wang
    • 1
  • Lei Lei
    • 1
  • Jian-Wen Ding
    • 1
  • Ke Guan
    • 1
  • Rui-Si He
    • 1
  1. 1.Beijing Jiaotong UniversityBeijingChina

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