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Transition of Power Structure

  • Xudong Zhao
Chapter
Part of the China Academic Library book series (CHINALIBR)

Abstract

In face of disputes, no matter we turn to the official national authority system or the civil one, these systems themselves need a process of development. The description of this process perhaps helps us to get an in-depth understanding of power relations in rural society to facilitate the effective solution of disputes.

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Copyright information

© Foreign Language Teaching and Research Publishing Co., Ltd and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xudong Zhao
    • 1
  1. 1.Renmin University of ChinaBeijingChina

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