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Li Village

  • Xudong Zhao
Chapter
Part of the China Academic Library book series (CHINALIBR)

Abstract

Li Village is located in Zhao County of Hebei Province, 50 km southeast of the provincial capital Shijiazhuang, nearly an hour’s drive between them. Zhao County, called Zhao Prefecture or Zhaozhou in the past, now belongs to Shijiazhuang.

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Copyright information

© Foreign Language Teaching and Research Publishing Co., Ltd and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xudong Zhao
    • 1
  1. 1.Renmin University of ChinaBeijingChina

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