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Biokerosene pp 575-605 | Cite as

Fuels from Pyrolysis

  • Lisa Thormann
  • Patricia Pizarro de Oro
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides a review on the production of biokerosene via pyrolysis of biomass. Accordingly, the technology of pyrolysis is described and classified into different operation modes, paying special attention to those conditions, reactors and biomass sources more suitable for the type of product (liquid fraction) targeted. The pyrolysis oil properties are characterized and compared with the specifications of conventional kerosene. These properties show that to implement pyrolysis oil as a “drop-in” fuel in the already existing kerosene infrastructure, some technical limitations need to be overcome. At present, challenges in the composition of pyrolysis oil remain, such as high acidity, chemical instability and high water and oxygen contents. For the purpose of increasing the quality of the pyrolysis oil, physical and chemical upgrading processes are described, including catalytic fast pyrolysis. The complexities of processes and reactions associated with increasing quality of pyrolysis oil are discussed. Finally, a brief overview of the current maturity level of the technology for biokerosene production via pyrolysis oil upgrading is presented.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Environmental Engineering and Energy EconomicsHamburg University of TechnologyHamburgGermany
  2. 2.Chemical and Environmental Engineering GroupRey Juan Carlos UniversityMadridSpain
  3. 3.Thermochemical Processes UnitIMDEA Energy InstituteMadridSpain

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