Sharp as a Tack

Measuring and Comparing Edge Sharpness in Motion-Compensated Medical Image Reconstruction
  • Oliver Taubmann
  • Jens Wetzl
  • Günter Lauritsch
  • Andreas Maier
  • Joachim Hornegger
Conference paper
Part of the Informatik aktuell book series (INFORMAT)

Abstract

Organ motion occuring during acquisition of medical images can cause motion blur artifacts, thus posing a major problem for many commonly employed modalities. Therefore, compensating for that motion during image reconstruction has been a focus of research for several years. However, objectively comparing the quality of different motion compensated reconstructions is no easy task. Often, intensity profiles across image edges are utilized to compare their sharpness. Manually positioning such a profile line is highly subjective and prone to bias. Expanding on this notion, we propose a robust, semi-automatic scheme for comparing edge sharpness using an ensemble of profiles. We study the behavior of our approach, which was implemented as an open-source tool, for synthetic data in the presence of noise and artifacts and demonstrate its practical use in respiratory motion-compensated MRI as well as cardiac motion-compensated C-arm CT.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oliver Taubmann
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jens Wetzl
    • 1
    • 2
  • Günter Lauritsch
    • 3
  • Andreas Maier
    • 1
    • 2
  • Joachim Hornegger
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Pattern Recognition LabFriedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-NurembergErlangen-NurembergDeutschland
  2. 2.Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT)ErlangenDeutschland
  3. 3.Siemens AGHealthcareForchheimDeutschland

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