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Abstract

How are digital skills developed for those involved in life transitions to employment? Digital skills are developed over time. Some of these skills are developed in formal education, others in informal and non-formal education settings. Digital skills are acquired over time through educational and social use of technology, through formal instruction, informal self-learning and learning from peers. Our world today requires digital skills to enable an individual to succeed in finding, evaluating and creating information for further and higher education, training and employment. This paper examines the need for these skills, some European initiatives and the frameworks which define the skills.

Keywords

IT competency frameworks IFIP CEN basic ICT skills 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denise Leahy
    • 1
  • Diana Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Trinity College DublinIreland

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