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Patterns of Software Modeling

  • Wolfgang Raschke
  • Massimiliano Zilli
  • Johannes Loinig
  • Reinhold Weiss
  • Christian Steger
  • Christian Kreiner
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8842)

Abstract

Software systems start small and grow in complexity and size. The larger a software system is, the more it is distributed over organizational and geographical confines. Thus, the modeling of software systems is necessary at a certain level of complexity because it can be used for communication, documentation, configuration and certification purposes. We came to the conclusion that several patterns of software modeling exist. The existence of such patterns is dependent on the history and the evolution of the system under consideration. We will show that a software system in its lifecycle has to face several crises. Such a crisis is a watershed in the application of new patterns. We provide an evolutionary view of software systems and models which helps understanding of current problems and prospective solutions.

Keywords

Model-Based Software Development Collaborative Software Development Application Lifecycle Management Software Process Improvement 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang Raschke
    • 1
  • Massimiliano Zilli
    • 1
  • Johannes Loinig
    • 2
  • Reinhold Weiss
    • 1
  • Christian Steger
    • 1
  • Christian Kreiner
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Technical InformaticsGraz University of TechnologyGrazAustria
  2. 2.NXP Semiconductors Austria GmbHGratkornAustria

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