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Market-Optimized Service Specification and Matching

  • Svetlana Arifulina
  • Marie Christin Platenius
  • Steffen Becker
  • Christian Gerth
  • Gregor Engels
  • Wilhelm Schäfer
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8831)

Abstract

Various approaches in service engineering are based on service markets where brokers use service matching in order to perform service discovery. For matching, a broker translates the specifications of providers’ services and requesters’ requirements into her own specification language, in order to check their compliance using a matcher. The broker’s success depends on the configuration of her language and its matcher because they influence important properties like the effort for providers and requesters to create suitable specifications as well as accuracy and runtime of matching. However, neither existing service specification languages, nor existing matching approaches are optimized in such way. Our approach automatically provides brokers with an optimal configuration of a language and its matcher to improve her success in a given market with respect to her strategy. The approach is based on formalized configuration properties and a predefined set of configuration rules.

Keywords

Service-Oriented Computing Service Engineering Service Specification Service Matching Service Brokers Service Market 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Svetlana Arifulina
    • 1
  • Marie Christin Platenius
    • 2
  • Steffen Becker
    • 2
  • Christian Gerth
    • 1
  • Gregor Engels
    • 1
  • Wilhelm Schäfer
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of PaderbornGermany
  2. 2.Heinz Nixdorf InstituteUniversity of PaderbornGermany

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