Spelt Wheat

  • Raimondo Cubadda
  • Emanuele Marconi
Chapter

Abstract

Cultivated wheats fall into two distinct classes according to their response to threshing. The more primitive forms have hulled grains. Their kernels are covered by tough paleae and spikelet glumes; thus the product of their threshing are spikelets, not grains.

Keywords

Durum Wheat Phytic Acid Common Wheat Spell Variety Flour Yield 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raimondo Cubadda
  • Emanuele Marconi

There are no affiliations available

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