An Investigation into a Computational Model for HMS

  • S. M. Deen
Chapter
Part of the Advanced Information Processing book series (AIP)

Abstract

This paper investigates a computational model for an abstract HMS operational scenario with a view to outlining rules that should be implemented in a holonic system to ensure a correct dynamic behaviour, particularly during operational disturbances. The model considers operations at the substructure levels of holons. It is claimed that without such a model the system behaviour will be unreliable, potentially causing not only wasted production but also uncontrolled executions. Three features considered under the computational model are execution consistency, execution termination in a finite time and operational stability. A failed action must be rolled back to a recoverable point for possible redoing, execution must follow a sequence of rules, termination must be guaranteed, and stability must be ensured. The paper argues against the implementation of a holonic system without such behavioural features.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. M. Deen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of KeeleEngland

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