FIPA Standards and Holonic Manufacturing

  • Vladimír Mařík
  • Michal Pěchouček
  • Pavel Vrba
  • Václav Hrdonka
Chapter
Part of the Advanced Information Processing book series (AIP)

Abstract

This paper documents the fact that the research in the two areas of holonic manufacturing systems and multi-agent systems contains substantial overlap. Many technologies and results achieved in the multi-agent area can be applied with advantage in the holonic field. This is especially true when talking about standardisation, which should enable interoperability of systems. The FIPA international consortium has introduced a systematic approach to development and maintenance of specifications and standards for the multi-agent domain. The principles of the FIPA Abstract Architecture are briefly described. Two examples of applications of FIPA standards in different areas within the scope of holonic systems (control, and production planning and supply chain management) are presented. FIPA standards have been recognised as a suitable candidate for ensuring complete interoperability in the holonic field.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vladimír Mařík
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michal Pěchouček
    • 1
  • Pavel Vrba
    • 2
  • Václav Hrdonka
    • 2
  1. 1.Gerstner Laboratory, Department of CyberneticsCzech Technical UniversityPragueCzech
  2. 2.Rockwell Automation Research CenterPragueCzech

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