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Transportation, Telecommunications, and the Changing Geography of Opportunity

  • Qing Shen
Part of the Advances in Spatial Science book series (ADVSPATIAL)

Abstract

New telecommunications — digital information and communication technologies that support interaction and transaction over long distances — are emerging as a primary force in shaping cities. And more fundamentally, they are becoming one of the most important variables in defining spatial relationships among people and organizations located in metropolitan areas. Manifested by the rapid growth of the Internet, ATMs, and mobile phones, telecommunications are permeating the physical structure, the economic production, and the social life of cities. Visibly and invisibly, these technologies are creating new spatial paths and barriers that will profoundly affect people’s access to economic opportunities and social services. Therefore, one of the most important tasks for urban researchers in the information age is to help policy makers and the general public to understand, monitor, predict, and respond to spatial consequences resulting from a massive-scale deployment of new telecommunications.

Keywords

Central City Public Transit Transportation Mode Impedance Function Accessibility Measure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Qing Shen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Urban Studies and PlanningMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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