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Netzanschlüsse nach Bedarf, Formalisierungen und Vervielfältigungen

Die Un-Ordnung der Wasserversorgung in Kimara, Dar es Salaam
  • Sophie Schramm
Chapter
Part of the Jahrbuch Stadterneuerung book series (JASTA)

Zusammenfassung

Kimara Mwisho ist eine gewöhnliche Siedlung in den wuchernden Vororten westlich von Dar es Salaam. Der dazugehörige Markt entlang der Ausfallstraße Morogoro highway ist inkrementell entstanden, als mehr und mehr Bewohner ihre ehemals landwirtschaftlich genutzten Grundstücke in Bauland für Wohn- und Geschäftsgebäude umwandelten. Diese Prozesse fanden größtenteils außerhalb staatlicher Kontrolle und zentraler Planung statt.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Universität KasselKasselDeutschland

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