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Perceived Party Placements and Uncertainty on Immigration in the 2017 German Election

  • Ingrid MauererEmail author
  • Micha Schneider
Chapter
Part of the Jahrbuch für Handlungs- und Entscheidungstheorie book series (JAHAEN)

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the two anonymous reviewers and the editors for their very valuable comments and suggestions. We also thank Hannah Reitz for assistance in preparing the tables.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Geschwister-Scholl-Institut für PolitikwissenschaftMunichGermany
  2. 2.Institut für StatistikMunichGermany

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