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Reflecting on Ethics in the Investigation of Online Communication during Emergencies

  • Eva GoldgruberEmail author
  • Julian Ausserhofer
  • Harald Hornmoen
  • Steen Steensen
  • Klas Backholm
  • Gudrun Reimerth
  • Elsebeth Frey
  • Rune Ottosen
  • Colin John McInnes
Chapter

Abstract

The use of social media to communicate in cases of emergencies has gained more and more importance in recent years. Studying such web and social media data is not only a methodological challenge, but ethical questions also arise. In this article we describe some of those ethical issues and our reflections with a focus on dissemination of results based on the RESCUE project.

Keywords

Ethics Social Media Research RESCUE project 

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eva Goldgruber
    • 1
    Email author
  • Julian Ausserhofer
    • 2
    • 3
  • Harald Hornmoen
    • 4
  • Steen Steensen
    • 4
  • Klas Backholm
    • 5
    • 6
  • Gudrun Reimerth
    • 1
  • Elsebeth Frey
    • 4
  • Rune Ottosen
    • 4
  • Colin John McInnes
    • 7
  1. 1.Institut Journalismus und Public RelationsFH JOANNEUM-University of Applied Sciences GrazGrazAustria
  2. 2.Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and SocietyBerlinGermany
  3. 3.Department of CommunicationUniversity of ViennaWienAustria
  4. 4.Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied SciencesOsloNorway
  5. 5.Åbo Akademi UniversityHelsinkiFinland
  6. 6.University of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  7. 7.Aberystwyth UniversityAberystwythUK

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