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International Law and the Use of Armed Force by States

  • Abel S. Knottnerus
Chapter
Part of the Staat – Souveränität – Nation book series (SSN)

Abstract

State violence is defined in this volume as “the illegitimate use of force by states against the rights of others.” This definition gives a first idea of what state violence is about, but it does not specify when the use of force by states becomes illegitimate or what the rights of others are, independently or in relation to states. When does the use of force by states turn into state violence? In this chapter, I address this question from the perspective of international law. The first part of the chapter discusses how different domains of international law regulate the use of armed force by states. What are the obligations of states, and what rights and responsibilities do individuals have under the law on the use of force, international humanitarian law, international human rights law and international criminal law? The second part examines how these rules are enforced by different international courts. Where can victims of state violence seek a form of reparation? Finally, the third part concludes by highlighting some of the main challenges for the international regulation of the use of armed force by states.

Keywords

Armed Force Security Council Armed Conflict International Criminal Court Rome Statute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands

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