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Biological Functions

  • G. G. B. Klaus
  • U. Hadding
  • N. R. Cooper
  • K. Rother
  • R. Buhl
  • G. O. Till
  • D. Bitter-Suermann
  • F. M. GriffinJr.
  • M. E. Medof
Chapter

Abstract

The principle function of complement is obviously as the effector and amplification arm of the humoral immune system. Although this has been recognized since the turn of the century, it is only within the last 15 years that it has also become evident that complement (in particular the pivotal component C3) plays an important role in the inductive phase of antibody responses. Two lines of evidence have led to this concept, the first being the demonstration of receptors for complement components on lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes. Of the three major types of complement receptor (CR) which have been described on a variety of cell types, two are particularly relevant here, since they occur on essentially all B-lymphocytes: CR1 (which binds C3b and iC3b), and CR2 (specific for C3d, C3d.g and iC3b) [14]. Further evidence for the importance of C3 in immune induction has come from a variety of studies in which cobra venom factor (CVF) has been used to deplete animals of C3. These will be discussed in some detail. The picture that has emerged is that C3 is crucially involved in both antigen retention and in immunoregulation in vivo, and that CR (especially CR2) may have a role in B-cell activation.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. G. B. Klaus
  • U. Hadding
  • N. R. Cooper
  • K. Rother
  • R. Buhl
  • G. O. Till
  • D. Bitter-Suermann
  • F. M. GriffinJr.
  • M. E. Medof

There are no affiliations available

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