Ailanthus altissima (the Tree of Heaven): In Vitro Culture and the Formation of Alkaloids and Quassinoids

  • M. F. Roberts
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 15)

Abstract

Ailanthus species (Simaroubaceae) have a history of use in traditional medicine, particularly for the treatment of dysentery (Steck 1972), A. altissima is particularly noted as an antibacterial, anthelmintic, amoebicide and insecticide (Polonsky 1973; Ohmoto et al. 1976; Varga et al. 1980, 1981); A. excelsa (Mehta and Patel 1959) is noted as a specific for respiratory problems and A. malabarica is noted for the treatment of dyspepsia, bronchitis, opthalmia and snake bite (Khan et al. 1982).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. F. Roberts
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacognosy, The School of PharmacyLondon UniversityLondonUK

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