The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Polymorphism in Drosophila melanogaster, Facts and Problems

  • W. van Delden
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-69646-6_11

Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)
Cite this paper as:
van Delden W. (1984) The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Polymorphism in Drosophila melanogaster, Facts and Problems. In: Wöhrmann K., Loeschcke V. (eds) Population Biology and Evolution. Proceedings in Life Sciences. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

The finding that most animal and plant species are highly polymorphic for allozyme variants (see reviews by Powell 1975, Nevo 1978, Brown 1979, Hamrick et al. 1979, and Avise and Aquadro 1982) has created a heated dispute concerning the significance and the maintenance of this kind of molecular variation, known as the selectionistneutralist controversy. In the neutralist view nucleotide substitutions in the course of evolution are mainly due to fixation of selectively neutral variants (Kimura 1968, Kimura and Ohta 1971, Kimura 1977). Allozyme variation in present-day populations is considered as biochemical noise in the neutralist view and is maintained for the greater part by mutation and drift. Selectionists, on the contrary, claim that selection, and most probably some kind of balancing selection, is the force maintaining allozyme variation (Clarke 1970, Richmond 1970, Wills 1973).

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. van Delden
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Genetics, Biology CenterUniversity of GroningenHaren (Gn)The Netherlands

Personalised recommendations