Infrasound

  • H. E. von Gierke
  • D. E. Parker
Part of the Handbook of Sensory Physiology book series (SENSORY, volume 5 / 3)

Abstract

Human beings ordinarily detect only a small portion of the sound energy to which they are exposed. Indeed, sound is usually defined in terms of the limited range of frequencies to which the human ear readily responds — the “audiofrequency” range. However, sound energy at frequencies below this audio-frequency range can elicit both auditory and nonauditory responses from human beings. It is energy in this infrasound range that is the focus of the present chapter. This chapter deals with air-transmitted infrasound only; structure-borne infrasound, usually described as vibration, is not included.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. E. von Gierke
    • 1
  • D. E. Parker
    • 1
  1. 1.Yellow Springs and OxfordUSA

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