The 1995 GFZ High Resolution Gravity Model

  • Thomas Gruber
  • Michael Anzenhofer
  • Matthias Rentsch
Part of the International Association of Geodesy Symposia book series (IAG SYMPOSIA, volume 116)

Abstract

In sequence of the GFZ93 high resolution gravity models (Gruber Th., et al, 1993) a new model, named GFZ95A, which is complete to degree and order 360 of a spherical harmonic series was computed. The model is based on new data sets, which were collected during the last months. This new data promises a major step towards a more precise high resolution gravity model. Especially from new available data over CIS (Community of Independent States) major progress can be expected with respect to the former models, which were based on predicted data in this area.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Gruber
    • 1
  • Michael Anzenhofer
    • 1
  • Matthias Rentsch
    • 1
  1. 1.GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ)OberpfaffenhofenGermany

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