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Disturbances and their Influence on Substrate Utilization Patterns in Soil Microbial Communities

  • Michael V. Gorlenko
  • T. N. Majorova
  • P. A. Kozhevin

Abstract

Multisubstrate testing methods allow to characterize soil microbial communities under different disturbance conditions and compare their functional profiles with properties and criteria of non-disturbed communities. Disturbance factors used (added glucose, added detergent powder, inoculation with an alien microbial consortium and Azospirillum brasilense populations) turned out to have a strong and specific influence on the substrate utilization patterns in the soils studied. The differences of functional profiles caused by presence of pollutant appear to be much stronger than the original differences between the zonal soil types. It was established that all soil microbial communities under study had similar cyclic nature of successional changes irrespective of soil type and the way of succession initiation.

Keywords

BIOLOG disturbance microbial ecology soil pollution substrate succession utilization 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael V. Gorlenko
    • 1
  • T. N. Majorova
    • 1
  • P. A. Kozhevin
    • 1
  1. 1.Soil Science Faculty, Soil Biology Department Vorobievy GoryMoscow State UniversityMoscowRussia

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