Neuroplasticity in the Adjustment to Blindness

  • A. Pascual-Leone
  • R. Hamilton
  • J. M. Tormos
  • J. P. Keenan
  • M. D. Catalá
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-59897-5_7

Part of the Research and Perspectives in Neurosciences book series (NEUROSCIENCE)
Cite this paper as:
Pascual-Leone A., Hamilton R., Tormos J.M., Keenan J.P., Catalá M.D. (1999) Neuroplasticity in the Adjustment to Blindness. In: Grafman J., Christen Y. (eds) Neuronal Plasticity: Building a Bridge from the Laboratory to the Clinic. Research and Perspectives in Neurosciences. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Summary

Loss of vision due to injury to the eyes results in deafferentation of very large areas of the human cortex and poses striking demands on other sensory systems to adjust to blindness in a society that heavily relies on vision. Blind subjects need to extract crucial spatial information from touch and hearing. To accomplish this, plastic trans-modal changes appear to take place by which a larger area of the sensorimotor cortex is devoted to the representation of the reading finger in Braille readers, and parts of the former visual cortex are recruited for the processing of tactile and auditory information.

These findings provide evidence of trans-modal sensory plasticity in humans. Similar mechanisms might be involved in other forms of skill learning and recovery from lesions. Recent studies suggest the possibility that available neurophysiologic techniques might not only be used to reveal such plastic changes, but may also have a potential role in guiding the plastic changes, thus improving functional outcome.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Pascual-Leone
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Hamilton
    • 1
  • J. M. Tormos
    • 2
  • J. P. Keenan
    • 1
  • M. D. Catalá
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory for Magnetic Brain Stimulation, Dept. NeurologyBeth Israel Deaconess Medical Center & Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Unidad de Neurobiologia, Dept. Fisiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientificasUniversidad de Valencia and Instituto CajalSpain

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