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Recommendations for Virtual Universities from Observed User Behavior

  • A. Geyer-Schulz
  • M. Hahsler
  • M. Jahn
Part of the Studies in Classification, Data Analysis, and Knowledge Organization book series (STUDIES CLASS)

Abstract

Recently recommender systems started to gain ground in commercial Web-applications. For example, the online-bookseller amazon.com recommends his customers books similar to the ones they bought using the analysis of observed purchase behavior of consumers.

In this article we describe a generic architecture for recommender services for information markets which has been implemented in the setting of the Virtual University of the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration (http://vu.wu-wien.ac.at). The architecture of a recommender service is defined as an agency of interacting software agents. It consists of three layers, namely the meta-data management system, the broker management system and the business-to-customer interface.

Keywords

Recommender System Information Object Software Agent Recommender Service Aggregation Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Geyer-Schulz
    • 1
  • M. Hahsler
    • 1
  • M. Jahn
    • 1
  1. 1.Abteilung für InformationswirtschaftWirtschaftsuniversität WienWienAustria

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