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Multi-taxa Surveys: Integrating Ecosystem Processes and User Demands

  • William E. MagnussonEmail author
  • Ben Lawson
  • Fabricio Baccaro
  • Carolina Volkmer de Castilho
  • J. Guy Castley
  • Flavia Costa
  • Debora P. Drucker
  • Elizabeth Franklin
  • Albertina P. Lima
  • Regina Luizão
  • Fernando Mendonça
  • Flávia Pezzini
  • Juliana Schietti
  • José Julio Toledo
  • Ana Tourinho
  • Luciano M. Verdade
  • Jean-Marc Hero
Chapter

Abstract

Globally, natural resource management agencies are increasingly recognizing the importance of long-term ecological research (LTER) for monitoring biodiversity, ranging from relatively simple, known, local-level issues, such as managing tourist impacts in a conservation park, to more complex, multifaceted, pervasive, and far-reaching impacts, such as global climate change. Much previous literature has confused protocols for LTER projects to answer current research questions, with developing a system for long-term ecological monitoring. Contrary to perceptions that these LTER systems are not driven by well-defined objectives, we argue that LTER systems can be designed and implemented with the specific objective of providing a basis for both LTER projects and long-term monitoring. We present an overview of RAPELD, an LTER system developed in Brazil, with comparable infrastructure established in Australia and Nepal. The standardized biodiversity infrastructure and research platform provides a long-term basis for powerful multi-disciplinary, multi-scale analyses.

Keywords

Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Black Swan Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Data Resource Management Agency LTER Site 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The PPBio RAPELD system in Brazil is funded by the Ministry of Science and Technology and many different partners in each Regional Hub (see http://ppbio.inpa.gov.br/Eng/nregionais/). It has received much support from ICMBIO and IBAMA staff, and much of the coordination is undertaken through the National Institute for Science and Technology for Amazonian Biodiversity (INCT-CENBAM). The PPBio system in Australia is partially funded by the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN), Brisbane City Council, SEQ Catchments, Condamine Alliance, Save the Bilby Fund and Griffith University. We thank Sarah Butler, Naomi Edwards, Clay Simpkins, and the many volunteers who measured trees at Karawatha.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • William E. Magnusson
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ben Lawson
    • 2
  • Fabricio Baccaro
    • 1
  • Carolina Volkmer de Castilho
    • 3
  • J. Guy Castley
    • 2
  • Flavia Costa
    • 1
  • Debora P. Drucker
    • 4
  • Elizabeth Franklin
    • 1
  • Albertina P. Lima
    • 1
  • Regina Luizão
    • 1
  • Fernando Mendonça
    • 5
  • Flávia Pezzini
    • 1
  • Juliana Schietti
    • 1
  • José Julio Toledo
    • 1
  • Ana Tourinho
    • 1
  • Luciano M. Verdade
    • 6
  • Jean-Marc Hero
    • 2
  1. 1.Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA)ManausBrazil
  2. 2.Environmental Futures Centre, School of EnvironmentGriffith UniversityGold CoastAustralia
  3. 3.Centro de Pesquisa Agroflorestal de RoraimaEmpresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (EMBRAPA)Boa VistaBrazil
  4. 4.EMBRAPA Monitoramento por SatéliteCampinasBrazil
  5. 5.Instituto de Saúde e Biotecnologia—ISBUniversidade Federal do Amazonas—UFAM, Campus Universitário do Médio SolimõesCoariBrazil
  6. 6.Centro de Energia Nuclear na AgriculturaUniversidade de São PauloPiracicabaBrazil

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