Comparison of GST Theta Activity in Liver and Kidney of Four Species

  • Ricarda Thier
  • Frederike A. Wiebel
  • Thomas G. Schulz
  • Andreas Hinke
  • Thomas Brüning
  • Hermann M. Bolt
Part of the Archives of Toxicology book series (TOXICOLOGY, volume 20)

Abstract

Glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyzing the conjugation of glutathione with electrophilic substrates are important enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Several isozymes exhibit polymorphisms in humans. The two deletion polymorphisms of hGSTM1 and hGSTT1 result in total loss of enzyme activity in homozygous null genotype (GSTM1*0 and GSTT1*0 respectively) individuals (Seidegård et al. 1988; Pemble et al. 1994). Individuals that are heterozygous for hGSTT1 show distinctly lower enzyme activities than individuals carrying two functional alleles of hGSTT1 (Wiebel et al. 1996). A similar effect is conceivable for the hGSTM1 polymorphism but has not been verified so far.

Abbreviations

GST

glutathione transferase

DCM

dichloromethane

EPNP

1,2-epoxy-3-(4′-nitrophenoxy)propane

MC

methyl chloride

NC

non conjugator

LC

low conjugator

HC

high conjugator

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ricarda Thier
    • 1
  • Frederike A. Wiebel
    • 1
  • Thomas G. Schulz
    • 2
  • Andreas Hinke
    • 2
    • 3
  • Thomas Brüning
    • 1
  • Hermann M. Bolt
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für ArbeitsphysiologieUniversität DortmundDortmundGermany
  2. 2.Institut für Arbeits- und SozialmedizinUniversität GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  3. 3.UrologischeUniversitätsklinik Marienhospital HerneHerneGermany

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