Public Housing and Neoliberal Policy in Japan

Chapter

Abstract

In many developed countries, postwar housing systems have included measures to provide social rented housing, playing an important role in improving the housing conditions of low-income groups. Over the past three decades, however, within the context of pervasive neoliberalism, governments have increasingly reoriented housing policies towards facilitating the production and consumption of market-based housing. This has led to the expansion of home ownership with reductions in the availability of social rented housing. Various societies are now beginning to experience new phases of housing situations with a decline in low-income housing.

Keywords

Housing Market Public Housing Housing Policy Housing System Liberal Democratic Party 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Abe M (2001) Jutaku seisaku niokeru jichitai no yakuwari [The role of municipalities in housing policy]. In: Harada S (ed) Nihon no Toshi Hou vol. 2 [Japan’s Urban Laws vol. 2]. Tokyo University Press, Tokyo, pp 299–320Google Scholar
  2. Balchin P (ed) (1996) Housing policy in Europe. Routledge, LondonGoogle Scholar
  3. Esping-Andersen G (1990) The three worlds of welfare capitalism. Polity Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  4. Esping-Andersen G (1997) Hybrid or unique?: the Japanese welfare state between Europe and America. J Eur Soc Policy 7(3):179–189CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Fitzpatrick S, Stephens M (eds) (2008) The future of social housing. Shelter, LondonGoogle Scholar
  6. Forrest R, Hirayama Y (2009) The uneven impact of neo-liberalism on housing opportunities. Int J Urban Reg Res 33(4):998–1013CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Fujita Y, Shionoya Y (eds) (1997) Kigyo nai Fukushi to Shakai Hosho [Employee benefits and social security]. Tokyo University Press, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  8. Fukui H (1992) The Japanese state and economic development: a profile of a nationalist-paternalist capitalist state. In: Applebaum RP, Henderson J (eds) State and development in the Asian Pacific Rim. Sage, LondonGoogle Scholar
  9. Groves R, Murie A, Watson C (eds) (2007) Housing and the new welfare state: perspectives from east Asia and Europe. Ashgate, AldershotGoogle Scholar
  10. Harada S (1985) Sengo jutaku housei no seiritsu katei [The establishment process of housing laws in post-war Japan]. In: Institute of Social Science, Tokyo University (ed) Fukushi Kokka vol. 6: Nihon no Shakai to Fukushi [The welfare state vol. 6: Japanese society and welfare]. Tokyo University Press, Tokyo, pp 317–396Google Scholar
  11. Harvey D (2005) A short history of neoliberalism. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  12. Hayakawa K (2002) Japan. In: Agus MA, Doling J, Lee D (eds) Housing policy systems in south and east Asia. Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills, pp 20–37Google Scholar
  13. Hirayama Y (2003) Housing and social inequality in Japan. In: Izuhara M (ed) Comparing social policies: exploring new perspectives in Britain and Japan. Polity Press, Bristol, pp 151–171Google Scholar
  14. Hirayama Y (2007) Housing and state strategy in post-war Japan. In: Groves R, Murie A, Watson C (eds) Housing and the new welfare state: perspectives from east Asia and Europe. Ashgate, Aldershot, pp 101–126Google Scholar
  15. Hirayama Y (2010a) Neoliberal policy and the housing safety net in Japan. City Cult Soc 1(3):119–126CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Hirayama Y (2010b) Housing pathway divergence in Japan’s insecure economy. Hous Stud 25(6):777–797CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Hirayama Y, Ronald R (2007) Housing and social transition in Japan. Routledge, LondonGoogle Scholar
  18. Holliday I (2000) Productivist welfare capitalism: social policy in east Asia. Political Stud 48:706–723CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Kemp P (ed) (2007) Housing allowances in comparative perspective. Policy Press, BristolGoogle Scholar
  20. Machimura T (2004) Kaihatsushugi no shuen ka, atarashii kaihatsushugika [The end of developmetalizm or new developmentalizm]. In: Watanabe O (ed) Henbo Suru Kigyo Shakai Nihon [Transformations in Japan’s company society]. Junpo Sha, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  21. Malpass P (2008) Housing and the new welfare state: wobbly pillar or cornerstone? Hous Stud 23(1):1–19CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Morimoto N (1994) Toshi Kyoju to Chintai Jutaku [Urban rental housing]. Gakugei Shuppan Sha, KyotoGoogle Scholar
  23. Murakami Y (1992) Han Koten no Seiji Keizai Gaku [Political economy of anti-classics]. Chuou Koron Sinsha, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  24. Ohmoto K (1985) Fukushi kokka to wagakuni jutaku seisaku no tenkai [The welfare state and housing policy in Japan]. In: Institute of Social Science, Tokyo University (ed) Fukushi Kokka vol. 6: Nihon no Shakai to Fukushi [The welfare state vol. 6: Japanese society and welfare]. Tokyo University Press, Tokyo, pp 397–452Google Scholar
  25. Ohmoto K (1996) Kyoju seisaku no gendai shi [Modern history of housing policy]. In: Ohmoto K, Kaino M (eds) Gendai Kyoju: Rekishi to Shiso [Housing policy: history and ideology]. Tokyo University Press, Tokyo, pp 89–120Google Scholar
  26. Oizumi E (2007) Transformations in housing construction and finance. In: Hirayama Y, Ronald R (eds) Housing and social transition in Japan. Routledge, London, pp 47–72Google Scholar
  27. Ronald R (2008) The ideology of home ownership: homeowner societies and the role of housing. Palgrave Macmillan, BasingstokeCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Sato I (2007) Welfare regime theories and the Japanese housing system. In: Hirayama Y, Ronald R (eds) Housing and social transition in Japan. Routledge, London, pp 73–93Google Scholar
  29. Saunders P (2005) Welfare to work in practice: social security and participation in economic and social life. Ashgate, AldershotGoogle Scholar
  30. Shinkawa T (1993) Nihongata Fukushi no Seiji-Keizaigaku [Political economy of Japanese-style social welfare]. San-ichi Shobo, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  31. Torgersen U (1987) Housing: the wobbly pillar under the welfare state. In: Turner B, Kemeny J, Lundqvist L (eds) Between state and market: housing in the post-industrial era. Almqvist and Wiksell International, Stockholm, pp 116–126Google Scholar
  32. Whitehead C (2003) Restructuring social housing systems. In: Forrest R, Lee J (eds) Housing and social change: east-west perspectives. Routledge, London, pp 46–68Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Human Development and EnvironmentKobe UniversityKobeJapan

Personalised recommendations