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Signal Orchestration System for Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning Flows

  • Davinia Hernández-Leo
  • Raul Nieves
  • Juan P. Carrascal
  • Josep Blat
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8095)

Abstract

This demonstration paper is focused on the Signal Orchestration System (SOS), a system that helps teachers in the implementation of dynamic collaborative learning flows in physical spaces, such as the classroom. It is based on the use of color, haptic and sound signals to communicate changing orchestration indications of collaborative learning flows such group formation and distribution of activities, roles, collaboration areas, resources, etc. The system is composed of personal devices (worn by students), located devices (in specific physical areas), and a manager (installed in the teacher’s computer to define and send the signals). Experimental results indicate that the SOS enables flexible orchestration of collaborative flows, facilitates orchestration awareness, decreases the time devoted to orchestration tasks and favors teachers’ and students’ attention to the learning task. The demonstration outline includes the on-the-fly configuration of the manager and the participation of attendees who, wearing the personal devices, are asked to react to the orchestration signals received in their personal devices, other attendees’ devices and located devices in the room.

Keywords

CSCL orchestration physical spaces wearable devices roomware 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Davinia Hernández-Leo
    • 1
  • Raul Nieves
    • 1
  • Juan P. Carrascal
    • 1
  • Josep Blat
    • 1
  1. 1.ICT DepartmentUniversitat Pompeu FabraBarcelonaSpain

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