Field and Service Robotics pp 1-17

Part of the Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics book series (STAR, volume 92) | Cite as

Utilization of Robot Systems in Disaster Sites of the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake

  • Fumitoshi Matsuno
  • Noritaka Sato
  • Kazuyuki Kon
  • Hiroki Igarashi
  • Tetsuya Kimura
  • Robin Murphy
Chapter

Abstract

In this paper, we report our activities in the real disaster areas damaged by the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake. From March 18–21, 2011, we tried to apply a ground rescue robot to the real disaster sites at Aomori Prefecture and Iwate Prefecture. On March 18, we carried out inspection mission in a damaged gymnasium. From March 19–21, we went to other sites to identify possibility of usage of robots, and we found the potential needs for not only ground robots but also underwater robots. Then, after the first activity we established a joint United States-Japanese team for underwater search. From April 19–23, 2011 the joint team brought four ROVs to Miyagi Prefecture for port inspection and to Iwate Prefecture for searching for submerged bodies. The joint team returned to Miyagi Prefecture October 22–26 with an AUV and two ROVs for cooperative debris mapping needed to assist with resuming fishing. Based on these experiences, we discuss the effectiveness and problems of applying the rescue robot in the real disaster sites.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fumitoshi Matsuno
    • 1
  • Noritaka Sato
    • 2
  • Kazuyuki Kon
    • 1
  • Hiroki Igarashi
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Kimura
    • 3
  • Robin Murphy
    • 4
  1. 1.Kyoto UniversityNishigyo-KuJapan
  2. 2.Nagoya Institute of TechnologyGokiso-choNagoyaJapan
  3. 3.Nagaoka University of TechnologyNiigataJapan
  4. 4.Texas A and M University, College StationTXUSA

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