Using a Biological Material to Improve Locomotion of Hexapod Robots

  • Poramate Manoonpong
  • Dennis Goldschmidt
  • Florentin Wörgötter
  • Alexander Kovalev
  • Lars Heepe
  • Stanislav Gorb
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-39802-5_48

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8064)
Cite this paper as:
Manoonpong P., Goldschmidt D., Wörgötter F., Kovalev A., Heepe L., Gorb S. (2013) Using a Biological Material to Improve Locomotion of Hexapod Robots. In: Lepora N.F., Mura A., Krapp H.G., Verschure P.F.M.J., Prescott T.J. (eds) Biomimetic and Biohybrid Systems. Living Machines 2013. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 8064. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Animals can move in not only elegant but also energy efficient ways. Their skin is one of the key components for this achievement. It provides a proper friction for forward motion and can protect them from slipping on a surface during locomotion. Inspired by this, we applied real shark skin to the foot soles of our hexapod robot AMOS. The material is formed to cover each foot of AMOS. Due to shark skin texture which has asymmetric profile inducing frictional anisotropy, this feature allows AMOS to grip specific surfaces and effectively locomote without slipping. Using real-time walking experiments, this study shows that implementing the biological material on the robot can reduce energy consumption while walking up a steep slope covered by carpets or other felt-like or rough substrates.

Keywords

Shark skin Biomechanics Walking robots Frictional anisotropy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Poramate Manoonpong
    • 1
  • Dennis Goldschmidt
    • 1
  • Florentin Wörgötter
    • 1
  • Alexander Kovalev
    • 2
  • Lars Heepe
    • 2
  • Stanislav Gorb
    • 2
  1. 1.Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience (BCCN)University of GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  2. 2.Department of Functional Morphology and Biomechanics, Zoological InstituteChristian-Albrechts-Universität zu KielKielGermany

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