A Minimal Model of the Phase Transition into Thermoregulatory Huddling

  • Jonathan Glancy
  • Roderich Groß
  • Stuart P. Wilson
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8064)

Abstract

Huddling by endotherms is an important model through which to study the emergence of complexity. Canals et al. (2011) have recently described the emergence of huddling in rodents as a phase transition mediated by the ambient environmental temperature [1]. We present an agent-based model as a minimal account of the reported transition to huddling at low temperatures. Simulation results suggest that the huddle self-organises as ambient temperature changes drive individuals from ‘orient-from-contacts’ to ‘orient-to-contact’ behaviours.

Keywords

self-organisation agent-based model thermoregulation 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Glancy
    • 1
  • Roderich Groß
    • 1
  • Stuart P. Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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