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Asynchronous Telemedicine Diagnosis of Musculoskeletal Injuries through a Prototype Interface in Virtual Reality Environment

  • Soheeb Khan
  • Vassilis Charissis
  • David Harrison
  • Sophia Sakellariou
  • Warren Chan
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8022)

Abstract

Telehealth provides a much needed option for remote diagnosis and monitoring of various pathologies and patients. Remote provision of health care can offer a two fold support for the medical system and the patients. Primarily it could serve isolated locations and secondly it could monitor a large number of outpatient cases directly on their homes instead of the hospital premises. However in specific cases direct communication and visual data acquisition can be a major obstacle. To this end we have developed a prototype system that could enable the medical practitioners to have real-time diagnosis through 3D captured visual and motion data. This data are recreated in a Virtual Reality environment in the hospital facilities offering a unique system for remote diagnosis. This paper presents the design considerations and development process of the system and discusses the preliminary results from the system evaluation. The paper concludes with a tentative plan of future work which aims to offer the medical practitioners and the patient with a complete interface which can acquire gait data and thus analyse a large variety of musculoskeletal pathologies.

Keywords

Virtual Reality HCI 3D Visualization Asynchronous Diagnosis Telemedicine Motion Capture 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Soheeb Khan
    • 1
  • Vassilis Charissis
    • 1
  • David Harrison
    • 1
  • Sophia Sakellariou
    • 2
  • Warren Chan
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Engineering and Built Environment, Department of Computer, Communications and Interactive SystemsGlasgow Caledonian UniversityGlasgowUK
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyRoyal InfirmaryGlasgowUK

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